Sources of help & information

Important note: Giving personal advice isn’t part of my role with Action for M.E., so please see your own pharmacist or GP about your health problems and medication. Don’t stop taking medication without speaking to your prescriber about any problems you may be having.

This isn’t an exhaustive list of help available but is based on the sort of questions I have been asked by people with M.E., family and friends of people with M.E., and health professionals. Click on the type of query below to take you to the appropriate part of this page. Links open in a new browser tab.

Health and medication queries ^back to top^

It’s really important to get any new symptoms you may be having checked out. Your own health professionals are the best people to talk to if you have any concerns or queries. If you’re unsure who to see or where to go for a particular problem, visit one of the websites at the end of this section to help you decide the right place to go with health queries in your part of the UK. Some CCGs have smartphone apps you can use to help you choose the right place in your local area to go to with your problem, such as walk-in centres.

Pharmacies can also be a good first port of call without the need for an appointment, as pharmacists are trained to recognise symptoms and help you decide what the appropriate course of action should be. This can be helpful if you’re not sure whether you need to see a doctor or if you have trouble getting appointments. They can also give you advice about your medication, such as side effects, safety of over-the-counter medication, and seasonal health advice.

Sources of reliable, evidence-based health information:

Pharmacy information ^back to top^

Pharmacies can be a good first port of call without the need for an appointment, as pharmacists are trained to recognise symptoms and help you decide what the appropriate course of action should be. This can be helpful if you’re not sure whether you need to see a doctor or if you have trouble getting appointments. They can also give you advice about your medication, such as side effects, safety of over-the-counter medication, and seasonal health advice.

Out of hours information:

Some pharmacies are open at evenings and weekends, especially ones within supermarkets, even when the supermarket itself is closed. There’s a local rota for bank holidays and Christmas advertised in local press and on your CCG’s website. You can go to any pharmacy for advice or to get a prescription dispensed out of hours – it doesn’t have to be your usual one.

Online bullying and staying safe ^back to top^

Online bullying is a serious issue and everyone has the right to feel safe online. If that means blocking or muting someone then don’t feel bad about doing that to protect yourself from harm, even if it’s just temporarily. Some resources about staying safe and coping with online bullying:

Emotional support ^back to top^

Information about M.E. ^back to top^

Information for your GP ^back to top^

Support for carers ^back to top^

A carer can be a partner, relative or friend of any age, who looks after someone unable to look after themselves on an unpaid basis.

Standing up for your rights ^back to top^

Information about Action for M.E. ^back to top^

Action for M.E. is an organisation led by people with M.E., for people with M.E. The majority of staff, trustees and volunteers either have M.E. themselves or have a loved one with the illness. The charity believes in transparency and welcomes queries about the work done and its values, so if the answer to your query isn’t found below, please do contact them via one of the methods on their contact details page  during normal office hours. I can’t answer queries myself as I have M.E., and therefore have limited energy.